Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere

S. M. Japar, T. J. Wallington, Jean M. Andino, J. C. Ball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH3O)2SO2, has been shown to be carcinogenic in different animal systems and is considered to be a probable human carcinogen. Even though the presence of DMS in the atmosphere is a potential human health concern, there is little known about its atmospheric formation or degradation. For example, it has been inferred but not proven, that DMS can be formed in the atmosphere from the reaction of methanol with sulfuric acid. This has led to questions concerning the potential impact that emissions from large vehicle fleets operating on methanol fuel might have on atmospheric DMS levels. To remove some of these uncertainties we have undertaken a systematic study of the homogeneous gas phase chemistry of DMS, in which we have addressed the following questions: (1) How is DMS formed in the atmosphere, and is methanol involved? and, (2) what is the fate of DMS in the atmosphere?

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting
Editors Anon
PublisherPubl by Air & Waste Management Assoc
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 1989
EventProceedings - 82nd A&WMA Annual Meeting - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: Jun 25 1989Jun 30 1989

Other

OtherProceedings - 82nd A&WMA Annual Meeting
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period6/25/896/30/89

Fingerprint

Methanol
Methanol fuels
Carcinogens
Sulfates
Sulfuric acid
Animals
Health
Degradation
Gases
Uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Japar, S. M., Wallington, T. J., Andino, J. M., & Ball, J. C. (1989). Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting (Vol. 3). Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc.

Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere. / Japar, S. M.; Wallington, T. J.; Andino, Jean M.; Ball, J. C.

Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting. ed. / Anon. Vol. 3 Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc, 1989.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Japar, SM, Wallington, TJ, Andino, JM & Ball, JC 1989, Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere. in Anon (ed.), Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting. vol. 3, Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc, Proceedings - 82nd A&WMA Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 6/25/89.
Japar SM, Wallington TJ, Andino JM, Ball JC. Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere. In Anon, editor, Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting. Vol. 3. Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc. 1989
Japar, S. M. ; Wallington, T. J. ; Andino, Jean M. ; Ball, J. C. / Analysis of the formation and reactivity of dimethyl sulfate in the atmosphere. Proceedings - A&WMA Annual Meeting. editor / Anon. Vol. 3 Publ by Air & Waste Management Assoc, 1989.
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