Artificial photosynthesis

Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion

Thomas A Moore, Ana L Moore, John Devens Gust, Michael Hambourger, Gary F. Moore, Amy Keirstead, Miguel Gervaldo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Provided significant challenges can be met, solar powered, bio-inspired constructs can contribute to renewable energy resources to meet human energy needs. The central challenge is reversing the combustion process by efficient water oxidation and reductive synthesis of CO2 to fuels. Nature's catalysts direct these oxidation/reduction reactions along coordinates that have low activation barriers and almost no side reactions. In principle, these reactions can be driven by electricity provided by sustainable sources. In order to accomplish this, it will be necessary to switch nature's catalysts from their usual source of redox potential - electron/proton carrying redox species - to emf at appropriate electrical potentials. Taking a step in this direction, we have assembled a hybrid system in which a porphyrin-sensitized Grätzel-type nanoparticulate wide band gap semiconductor photoanode is used as an interface between emf and redox potential for the photochemical reformation of biomass to hydrogen.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2008 - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: Apr 6 2008Apr 10 2008

Other

Other235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period4/6/084/10/08

Fingerprint

Photosynthesis
Energy conversion
Solar energy
Renewable energy resources
Catalysts
Redox reactions
Porphyrins
Electric potential
Hybrid systems
Protons
Hydrogen
Biomass
Electricity
Chemical activation
Switches
Oxidation
Electrons
Water
Oxidation-Reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Moore, T. A., Moore, A. L., Gust, J. D., Hambourger, M., Moore, G. F., Keirstead, A., & Gervaldo, M. (2008). Artificial photosynthesis: Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts

Artificial photosynthesis : Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion. / Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, John Devens; Hambourger, Michael; Moore, Gary F.; Keirstead, Amy; Gervaldo, Miguel.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Moore, TA, Moore, AL, Gust, JD, Hambourger, M, Moore, GF, Keirstead, A & Gervaldo, M 2008, Artificial photosynthesis: Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2008, New Orleans, LA, United States, 4/6/08.
Moore TA, Moore AL, Gust JD, Hambourger M, Moore GF, Keirstead A et al. Artificial photosynthesis: Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2008
Moore, Thomas A ; Moore, Ana L ; Gust, John Devens ; Hambourger, Michael ; Moore, Gary F. ; Keirstead, Amy ; Gervaldo, Miguel. / Artificial photosynthesis : Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion. ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2008.
@inproceedings{5a6a127b10614adea682558c32386f17,
title = "Artificial photosynthesis: Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion",
abstract = "Provided significant challenges can be met, solar powered, bio-inspired constructs can contribute to renewable energy resources to meet human energy needs. The central challenge is reversing the combustion process by efficient water oxidation and reductive synthesis of CO2 to fuels. Nature's catalysts direct these oxidation/reduction reactions along coordinates that have low activation barriers and almost no side reactions. In principle, these reactions can be driven by electricity provided by sustainable sources. In order to accomplish this, it will be necessary to switch nature's catalysts from their usual source of redox potential - electron/proton carrying redox species - to emf at appropriate electrical potentials. Taking a step in this direction, we have assembled a hybrid system in which a porphyrin-sensitized Gr{\"a}tzel-type nanoparticulate wide band gap semiconductor photoanode is used as an interface between emf and redox potential for the photochemical reformation of biomass to hydrogen.",
author = "Moore, {Thomas A} and Moore, {Ana L} and Gust, {John Devens} and Michael Hambourger and Moore, {Gary F.} and Amy Keirstead and Miguel Gervaldo",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780841269859",
booktitle = "ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Artificial photosynthesis

T2 - Combining technology with biology for efficient solar energy conversion

AU - Moore, Thomas A

AU - Moore, Ana L

AU - Gust, John Devens

AU - Hambourger, Michael

AU - Moore, Gary F.

AU - Keirstead, Amy

AU - Gervaldo, Miguel

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Provided significant challenges can be met, solar powered, bio-inspired constructs can contribute to renewable energy resources to meet human energy needs. The central challenge is reversing the combustion process by efficient water oxidation and reductive synthesis of CO2 to fuels. Nature's catalysts direct these oxidation/reduction reactions along coordinates that have low activation barriers and almost no side reactions. In principle, these reactions can be driven by electricity provided by sustainable sources. In order to accomplish this, it will be necessary to switch nature's catalysts from their usual source of redox potential - electron/proton carrying redox species - to emf at appropriate electrical potentials. Taking a step in this direction, we have assembled a hybrid system in which a porphyrin-sensitized Grätzel-type nanoparticulate wide band gap semiconductor photoanode is used as an interface between emf and redox potential for the photochemical reformation of biomass to hydrogen.

AB - Provided significant challenges can be met, solar powered, bio-inspired constructs can contribute to renewable energy resources to meet human energy needs. The central challenge is reversing the combustion process by efficient water oxidation and reductive synthesis of CO2 to fuels. Nature's catalysts direct these oxidation/reduction reactions along coordinates that have low activation barriers and almost no side reactions. In principle, these reactions can be driven by electricity provided by sustainable sources. In order to accomplish this, it will be necessary to switch nature's catalysts from their usual source of redox potential - electron/proton carrying redox species - to emf at appropriate electrical potentials. Taking a step in this direction, we have assembled a hybrid system in which a porphyrin-sensitized Grätzel-type nanoparticulate wide band gap semiconductor photoanode is used as an interface between emf and redox potential for the photochemical reformation of biomass to hydrogen.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955634195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955634195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9780841269859

BT - ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts

ER -