Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives: Diisopropyl ether

T. J. Wallington, Jean M. Andino, A. R. Potts, S. J. Rudy, W. O. Siegl, Z. Zhang, M. J. Kurylo, R. E. Hule

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To quantify the atmospheric reactivity of diisopropyl ether (DIPE), we have conducted a study of the kinetics and mechanism of reaction 1: OH + DIPE → products. Kinetic measurements of reaction 1 were made using both -relative (at 295 K) and absolute techniques (over the temperature range 240-440 K). Rate data from both techniques can be represented by the following: k1 = (2.2-0.8 +1.4 x 10-12 exp[(445 ± 145)/T]cm3 molecule-1s-1. At 298 K, k1 = 9.8 X 10-12cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The products of the simulated atmospheric oxidation of DIPE were identified using FT-IR spectroscopy; isopropyl acetate and HCHO were the main products. The atmospheric oxidation of DIPE can be represented by i-C3H7O-i-C3H7+OH+2NO→ HCHO+i-C3H7OC(O)CH3+HO2+2NO2. Our kinetic and mechanistic data were incorporated into a 1-day simulation of atmospheric chemistry to quantify the relative incremental reactivity of DIPE. Results are compared with other oxygenated fuel additives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-104
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Atmospheric chemistry
Fuel additives
Automotive fuels
atmospheric chemistry
ether
Ethers
kinetics
Kinetics
oxidation
Oxidation
Molecules
Infrared spectroscopy
acetate
spectroscopy
diisopropyl ether
fuel additive
simulation
product
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Wallington, T. J., Andino, J. M., Potts, A. R., Rudy, S. J., Siegl, W. O., Zhang, Z., ... Hule, R. E. (1993). Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives: Diisopropyl ether. Environmental Science and Technology, 27(1), 98-104. https://doi.org/10.1021/es00038a009

Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives : Diisopropyl ether. / Wallington, T. J.; Andino, Jean M.; Potts, A. R.; Rudy, S. J.; Siegl, W. O.; Zhang, Z.; Kurylo, M. J.; Hule, R. E.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1993, p. 98-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wallington, TJ, Andino, JM, Potts, AR, Rudy, SJ, Siegl, WO, Zhang, Z, Kurylo, MJ & Hule, RE 1993, 'Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives: Diisopropyl ether', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 98-104. https://doi.org/10.1021/es00038a009
Wallington, T. J. ; Andino, Jean M. ; Potts, A. R. ; Rudy, S. J. ; Siegl, W. O. ; Zhang, Z. ; Kurylo, M. J. ; Hule, R. E. / Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives : Diisopropyl ether. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 1993 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 98-104.
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