Bound manganese oxides capable of reducing the bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

Eduardo Espiritu, Kori D. Chamberlain, Jo Ann C. Williams, James P. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A biohybrid model system is described that interfaces synthetic Mn-oxides with bacterial reaction centers to gain knowledge concerning redox reactions by metal clusters in proteins, in particular the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II. The ability of Mn-oxides to bind to modified bacterial reaction centers and transfer an electron to the light-induced oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer, P+, was characterized using optical spectroscopy. The environment of P was altered to obtain a high P/P+ midpoint potential. In addition, different metal-binding sites were introduced by substitution of amino acid residues as well as extension of the C-terminus of the M subunit with the C-terminal region of the D1 subunit of photosystem II. The Mn-compounds MnO2, αMn2O3, Mn3O4, CaMn2O4, and Mn3(PO4)2 were tested and compared to MnCl2. In general, addition of the Mn-compounds resulted in a decrease in the amount of P+ while the reduced quinone was still present, demonstrating that the Mn-compounds can serve as secondary electron donors. The extent of P+ reduction for the Mn-oxides was largest for αMn2O3 and CaMn2O4 and smallest for Mn3O4 and MnO2. The addition of Mn3(PO4)2 resulted in nearly complete P+ reduction, similar to MnCl2. Overall, the activity was correlated with the initial oxidation state of the Mn-compound. Transient optical measurements showed a fast kinetic component, assigned to reduction of P+ by the Mn-oxide, in addition to a slow component due to charge recombination. The results support the conjecture that the incorporation of Mn-oxides by ancient anoxygenic phototrophs was a step in the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhotosynthesis Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Bacteriochlorophylls
Rhodobacter sphaeroides
manganese oxides
Dimers
Oxides
Photosystem II Protein Complex
photosystem II
Metals
metals
Electrons
redox reactions
Photosynthesis
Redox reactions
amino acid substitution
autotrophs
Amino Acid Substitution
quinones
Genetic Recombination
electron transfer
Oxidation-Reduction

Keywords

  • Bacterial reaction centers
  • Electron transfer
  • Mn-cofactors
  • Optical spectroscopy
  • Secondary electron donors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Bound manganese oxides capable of reducing the bacteriochlorophyll dimer of modified reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. / Espiritu, Eduardo; Chamberlain, Kori D.; Williams, Jo Ann C.; Allen, James P.

In: Photosynthesis Research, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "A biohybrid model system is described that interfaces synthetic Mn-oxides with bacterial reaction centers to gain knowledge concerning redox reactions by metal clusters in proteins, in particular the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II. The ability of Mn-oxides to bind to modified bacterial reaction centers and transfer an electron to the light-induced oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer, P+, was characterized using optical spectroscopy. The environment of P was altered to obtain a high P/P+ midpoint potential. In addition, different metal-binding sites were introduced by substitution of amino acid residues as well as extension of the C-terminus of the M subunit with the C-terminal region of the D1 subunit of photosystem II. The Mn-compounds MnO2, αMn2O3, Mn3O4, CaMn2O4, and Mn3(PO4)2 were tested and compared to MnCl2. In general, addition of the Mn-compounds resulted in a decrease in the amount of P+ while the reduced quinone was still present, demonstrating that the Mn-compounds can serve as secondary electron donors. The extent of P+ reduction for the Mn-oxides was largest for αMn2O3 and CaMn2O4 and smallest for Mn3O4 and MnO2. The addition of Mn3(PO4)2 resulted in nearly complete P+ reduction, similar to MnCl2. Overall, the activity was correlated with the initial oxidation state of the Mn-compound. Transient optical measurements showed a fast kinetic component, assigned to reduction of P+ by the Mn-oxide, in addition to a slow component due to charge recombination. The results support the conjecture that the incorporation of Mn-oxides by ancient anoxygenic phototrophs was a step in the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.",
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AB - A biohybrid model system is described that interfaces synthetic Mn-oxides with bacterial reaction centers to gain knowledge concerning redox reactions by metal clusters in proteins, in particular the Mn4CaO5 cluster of photosystem II. The ability of Mn-oxides to bind to modified bacterial reaction centers and transfer an electron to the light-induced oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer, P+, was characterized using optical spectroscopy. The environment of P was altered to obtain a high P/P+ midpoint potential. In addition, different metal-binding sites were introduced by substitution of amino acid residues as well as extension of the C-terminus of the M subunit with the C-terminal region of the D1 subunit of photosystem II. The Mn-compounds MnO2, αMn2O3, Mn3O4, CaMn2O4, and Mn3(PO4)2 were tested and compared to MnCl2. In general, addition of the Mn-compounds resulted in a decrease in the amount of P+ while the reduced quinone was still present, demonstrating that the Mn-compounds can serve as secondary electron donors. The extent of P+ reduction for the Mn-oxides was largest for αMn2O3 and CaMn2O4 and smallest for Mn3O4 and MnO2. The addition of Mn3(PO4)2 resulted in nearly complete P+ reduction, similar to MnCl2. Overall, the activity was correlated with the initial oxidation state of the Mn-compound. Transient optical measurements showed a fast kinetic component, assigned to reduction of P+ by the Mn-oxide, in addition to a slow component due to charge recombination. The results support the conjecture that the incorporation of Mn-oxides by ancient anoxygenic phototrophs was a step in the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

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KW - Electron transfer

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