Computer Simulation of Impedance Spectroscopy in Two Dimensions

Application to Cement Paste

R. Tate Coverdale, Edward J. Garboczi, Hamlin M. Jennings, Bruce J. Christensen, Thomas O Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A random 2‐D digital‐image‐based microstructural model is used to simulate impedance spectroscopy of cement paste. Results of these simulations are used to interpret previous experimental results. The main features of the impedance spectra of cement paste are the result of the composite nature of cement paste; in other words, the electrical response varies as different phases, each with its own specific electrical properties, are consumed and generated. Percolation theory is invoked to help explore certain relationships between two‐ and three‐dimensional analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1513-1520
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Ointments
Cements
Adhesive pastes
Spectroscopy
Computer simulation
Electric properties
Composite materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Computer Simulation of Impedance Spectroscopy in Two Dimensions : Application to Cement Paste. / Coverdale, R. Tate; Garboczi, Edward J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.; Christensen, Bruce J.; Mason, Thomas O.

In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 76, No. 6, 1993, p. 1513-1520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coverdale, R. Tate ; Garboczi, Edward J. ; Jennings, Hamlin M. ; Christensen, Bruce J. ; Mason, Thomas O. / Computer Simulation of Impedance Spectroscopy in Two Dimensions : Application to Cement Paste. In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society. 1993 ; Vol. 76, No. 6. pp. 1513-1520.
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