Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems

Sean M. Babiniec, James E. Miller, Andrea Ambrosini, Ellen Stechel, Eric N. Coker, Peter G. Loutzenhiser, Clifford K. Ho

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an effort to increase thermal energy storage densities and turbine inlet temperatures in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, focus on energy storage media has shifted from molten salts to solid particles. These solid particles are stable at temperatures far greater than that of molten salts, allowing the use of efficient high-temperature turbines in the power cycle. Furthermore, many of the solid particles under development store heat via reversible chemical reactions (thermochemical energy storage, TCES) in addition to the heat they store as sensible energy. The heat-storing reaction is often the thermal reduction of a metal oxide. If coupled to an Air-Brayton system, wherein air is used as the turbine working fluid, the subsequent extraction of both reaction and sensible heat, as well as the transfer of heat to the working fluid, can be accomplished in a direct-contact, counter-flow reoxidation reactor. However, there are several design challenges unique to such a reactor, such as maintaining requisite residence times for reactions to occur, particle conveying and mitigation of entrainment, and the balance of kinetics and heat transfer rates to achieve reactor outlet temperatures in excess of 1200 °C. In this paper, insights to addressing these challenges are offered, and design and operational tradeoffs that arise in this highlycoupled system are introduced and discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9780791850220
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventASME 2016 10th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2016, collocated with the ASME 2016 Power Conference and the ASME 2016 14th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology - Charlotte, United States
Duration: Jun 26 2016Jun 30 2016

Other

OtherASME 2016 10th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2016, collocated with the ASME 2016 Power Conference and the ASME 2016 14th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology
CountryUnited States
CityCharlotte
Period6/26/166/30/16

Fingerprint

Energy storage
Turbines
Temperature
Molten materials
Salts
Fluids
Conveying
Air
Thermal energy
Contacts (fluid mechanics)
Solar energy
Hot Temperature
Chemical reactions
Heat transfer
Kinetics
Oxides
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

Babiniec, S. M., Miller, J. E., Ambrosini, A., Stechel, E., Coker, E. N., Loutzenhiser, P. G., & Ho, C. K. (2016). Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems. In Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies (Vol. 1). [59646] American Society of Mechanical Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2016-59646

Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems. / Babiniec, Sean M.; Miller, James E.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Stechel, Ellen; Coker, Eric N.; Loutzenhiser, Peter G.; Ho, Clifford K.

Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016. 59646.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Babiniec, SM, Miller, JE, Ambrosini, A, Stechel, E, Coker, EN, Loutzenhiser, PG & Ho, CK 2016, Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems. in Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies. vol. 1, 59646, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2016 10th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2016, collocated with the ASME 2016 Power Conference and the ASME 2016 14th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, Charlotte, United States, 6/26/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2016-59646
Babiniec SM, Miller JE, Ambrosini A, Stechel E, Coker EN, Loutzenhiser PG et al. Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems. In Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies. Vol. 1. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2016. 59646 https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2016-59646
Babiniec, Sean M. ; Miller, James E. ; Ambrosini, Andrea ; Stechel, Ellen ; Coker, Eric N. ; Loutzenhiser, Peter G. ; Ho, Clifford K. / Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems. Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016.
@inproceedings{2b17ccd7328249b8b7df2d084ae26916,
title = "Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems",
abstract = "In an effort to increase thermal energy storage densities and turbine inlet temperatures in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, focus on energy storage media has shifted from molten salts to solid particles. These solid particles are stable at temperatures far greater than that of molten salts, allowing the use of efficient high-temperature turbines in the power cycle. Furthermore, many of the solid particles under development store heat via reversible chemical reactions (thermochemical energy storage, TCES) in addition to the heat they store as sensible energy. The heat-storing reaction is often the thermal reduction of a metal oxide. If coupled to an Air-Brayton system, wherein air is used as the turbine working fluid, the subsequent extraction of both reaction and sensible heat, as well as the transfer of heat to the working fluid, can be accomplished in a direct-contact, counter-flow reoxidation reactor. However, there are several design challenges unique to such a reactor, such as maintaining requisite residence times for reactions to occur, particle conveying and mitigation of entrainment, and the balance of kinetics and heat transfer rates to achieve reactor outlet temperatures in excess of 1200 °C. In this paper, insights to addressing these challenges are offered, and design and operational tradeoffs that arise in this highlycoupled system are introduced and discussed.",
author = "Babiniec, {Sean M.} and Miller, {James E.} and Andrea Ambrosini and Ellen Stechel and Coker, {Eric N.} and Loutzenhiser, {Peter G.} and Ho, {Clifford K.}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1115/ES2016-59646",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
booktitle = "Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Considerations for the design of a high-temperature particle reoxidation reactor for extraction of heat in thermochemical energy storage systems

AU - Babiniec, Sean M.

AU - Miller, James E.

AU - Ambrosini, Andrea

AU - Stechel, Ellen

AU - Coker, Eric N.

AU - Loutzenhiser, Peter G.

AU - Ho, Clifford K.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - In an effort to increase thermal energy storage densities and turbine inlet temperatures in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, focus on energy storage media has shifted from molten salts to solid particles. These solid particles are stable at temperatures far greater than that of molten salts, allowing the use of efficient high-temperature turbines in the power cycle. Furthermore, many of the solid particles under development store heat via reversible chemical reactions (thermochemical energy storage, TCES) in addition to the heat they store as sensible energy. The heat-storing reaction is often the thermal reduction of a metal oxide. If coupled to an Air-Brayton system, wherein air is used as the turbine working fluid, the subsequent extraction of both reaction and sensible heat, as well as the transfer of heat to the working fluid, can be accomplished in a direct-contact, counter-flow reoxidation reactor. However, there are several design challenges unique to such a reactor, such as maintaining requisite residence times for reactions to occur, particle conveying and mitigation of entrainment, and the balance of kinetics and heat transfer rates to achieve reactor outlet temperatures in excess of 1200 °C. In this paper, insights to addressing these challenges are offered, and design and operational tradeoffs that arise in this highlycoupled system are introduced and discussed.

AB - In an effort to increase thermal energy storage densities and turbine inlet temperatures in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, focus on energy storage media has shifted from molten salts to solid particles. These solid particles are stable at temperatures far greater than that of molten salts, allowing the use of efficient high-temperature turbines in the power cycle. Furthermore, many of the solid particles under development store heat via reversible chemical reactions (thermochemical energy storage, TCES) in addition to the heat they store as sensible energy. The heat-storing reaction is often the thermal reduction of a metal oxide. If coupled to an Air-Brayton system, wherein air is used as the turbine working fluid, the subsequent extraction of both reaction and sensible heat, as well as the transfer of heat to the working fluid, can be accomplished in a direct-contact, counter-flow reoxidation reactor. However, there are several design challenges unique to such a reactor, such as maintaining requisite residence times for reactions to occur, particle conveying and mitigation of entrainment, and the balance of kinetics and heat transfer rates to achieve reactor outlet temperatures in excess of 1200 °C. In this paper, insights to addressing these challenges are offered, and design and operational tradeoffs that arise in this highlycoupled system are introduced and discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85002125785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85002125785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/ES2016-59646

DO - 10.1115/ES2016-59646

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - 1

BT - Biofuels, Hydrogen, Syngas, and Alternate Fuels; CHP and Hybrid Power and Energy Systems; Concentrating Solar Power; Energy Storage; Environmental, Economic, and Policy Considerations of Advanced Energy Systems; Geothermal, Ocean, and Emerging Energy Technologies; Photovoltaics; Posters; Solar Chemistry; Sustainable Building Energy Systems; Sustainable Infrastructure and Transportation; Thermodynamic Analysis of Energy Systems; Wind Energy Systems and Technologies

PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers

ER -