Control and characterization of cyclopentene unimolecular dissociation on Si(100) with scanning tunneling microscopy

Nathan L. Yoder, James S. Fakonas, Mark C Hersam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dissociation of individual cyclopentene molecules on the Si(100) surface is induced and investigated using cryogenic ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using a secondary feedback loop during elevated tunneling current and sample biasing conditions, the cyclopentene dissociation products are isolated and then characterized with atomic-scale spatial resolution. Using multibias STM and density functional theory, the cyclopentene dissociation products are shown to consist of a C5H7 fragment and an individual H atom. The C5H7 fragment contains a C=C double bond and is bound to the Si(100) surface via a single Si - C covalent bond, while the individual H atom can be induced to hop between two sites on a single silicon dimer with the STM tip. This study shows that the use of feedback control during STM-induced single molecule reactions allows transient reaction products to be captured and thus more thoroughly studied. While demonstrated here for cyclopentene on Si(100), this feedback-controlled approach can likely be applied to a wide array of chemical reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10059-10065
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume131
Issue number29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 29 2009

Fingerprint

Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy
Cyclopentanes
Scanning tunneling microscopy
Feedback
Humulus
Atoms
Semiconductors
Molecules
Covalent bonds
Ultrahigh vacuum
Silicon
Vacuum
Reaction products
Dimers
Cryogenics
Feedback control
Density functional theory
Chemical reactions
Semiconductor materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Control and characterization of cyclopentene unimolecular dissociation on Si(100) with scanning tunneling microscopy. / Yoder, Nathan L.; Fakonas, James S.; Hersam, Mark C.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 131, No. 29, 29.07.2009, p. 10059-10065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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