Controlled nanoscale morphology of hematite (0001) surfaces grown by chemical vapor transport

Mark E. Greene, Ann N. Chiaramonti, Steven T. Christensen, Lixin Cao, Michael J. Bedzyk, Mark C Hersam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nanoscale morphology of the hematite (0001) surface was characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The atomically flat domains extend for tens of micrometers and are bound by highly stepped regions. The hematite crystals were grown via a chemical vapor transport (CVT) technique, by using HCl gas as the transport agent. The long-term stability of these surface suggests that they may serve as effective templates for the growth, patterning, and embossing of nanostructures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1765-1768
Number of pages4
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume17
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 18 2005

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Hematite
Vapors
Atomic force microscopy
Nanostructures
Gases
Crystals
ferric oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Controlled nanoscale morphology of hematite (0001) surfaces grown by chemical vapor transport. / Greene, Mark E.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Christensen, Steven T.; Cao, Lixin; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Hersam, Mark C.

In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 17, No. 14, 18.07.2005, p. 1765-1768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greene, ME, Chiaramonti, AN, Christensen, ST, Cao, L, Bedzyk, MJ & Hersam, MC 2005, 'Controlled nanoscale morphology of hematite (0001) surfaces grown by chemical vapor transport', Advanced Materials, vol. 17, no. 14, pp. 1765-1768. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.200401459
Greene, Mark E. ; Chiaramonti, Ann N. ; Christensen, Steven T. ; Cao, Lixin ; Bedzyk, Michael J. ; Hersam, Mark C. / Controlled nanoscale morphology of hematite (0001) surfaces grown by chemical vapor transport. In: Advanced Materials. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 14. pp. 1765-1768.
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