Defect tolerance and the effect of structural inhomogeneity in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices

Michael B. Ross, Jessie C. Ku, Martin G. Blaber, Chad A. Mirkin, George C Schatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bottom-up assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles exhibit unique optical effects such as tunable reflection, optical cavity modes, and tunable photonic resonances. Here, we compare detailed simulations with experiment to explore the effect of structural inhomogeneity on the optical response in DNA-gold nanoparticle superlattices. In particular, we explore the effect of background environment, nanoparticle polydispersity (>10%), and variation in nanoparticle placement (∼5%). At volume fractions less than 20% Au, the optical response is insensitive to particle size, defects, and inhomogeneity in the superlattice. At elevated volume fractions (20% and 25%), structures incorporating different sized nanoparticles (10-, 20-, and 40-nm diameter) each exhibit distinct far-field extinction and near-field properties. These optical properties are most pronounced in lattices with larger particles, which at fixed volume fraction have greater plasmonic coupling than those with smaller particles. Moreover, the incorporation of experimentally informed inhomogeneity leads to variation in far-field extinction and inconsistent electric-field intensities throughout the lattice, demonstrating that volume fraction is not sufficient to describe the optical properties of such structures. These data have important implications for understanding the role of particle and lattice inhomogeneity in determining the properties of plasmonic nanoparticle lattices with deliberately designed optical properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10292-10297
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number33
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 18 2015

Fingerprint

Nanoparticles
DNA
Optics and Photonics
Particle Size
Gold

Keywords

  • Disorder
  • DNA
  • Nanoparticle
  • Noble metal
  • Plasmonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Defect tolerance and the effect of structural inhomogeneity in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. / Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Blaber, Martin G.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Schatz, George C.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 112, No. 33, 18.08.2015, p. 10292-10297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{57169c1fccbc46cca2b58e650c80cb79,
title = "Defect tolerance and the effect of structural inhomogeneity in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices",
abstract = "Bottom-up assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles exhibit unique optical effects such as tunable reflection, optical cavity modes, and tunable photonic resonances. Here, we compare detailed simulations with experiment to explore the effect of structural inhomogeneity on the optical response in DNA-gold nanoparticle superlattices. In particular, we explore the effect of background environment, nanoparticle polydispersity (>10{\%}), and variation in nanoparticle placement (∼5{\%}). At volume fractions less than 20{\%} Au, the optical response is insensitive to particle size, defects, and inhomogeneity in the superlattice. At elevated volume fractions (20{\%} and 25{\%}), structures incorporating different sized nanoparticles (10-, 20-, and 40-nm diameter) each exhibit distinct far-field extinction and near-field properties. These optical properties are most pronounced in lattices with larger particles, which at fixed volume fraction have greater plasmonic coupling than those with smaller particles. Moreover, the incorporation of experimentally informed inhomogeneity leads to variation in far-field extinction and inconsistent electric-field intensities throughout the lattice, demonstrating that volume fraction is not sufficient to describe the optical properties of such structures. These data have important implications for understanding the role of particle and lattice inhomogeneity in determining the properties of plasmonic nanoparticle lattices with deliberately designed optical properties.",
keywords = "Disorder, DNA, Nanoparticle, Noble metal, Plasmonics",
author = "Ross, {Michael B.} and Ku, {Jessie C.} and Blaber, {Martin G.} and Mirkin, {Chad A.} and Schatz, {George C}",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.1513058112",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "10292--10297",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
number = "33",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Defect tolerance and the effect of structural inhomogeneity in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices

AU - Ross, Michael B.

AU - Ku, Jessie C.

AU - Blaber, Martin G.

AU - Mirkin, Chad A.

AU - Schatz, George C

PY - 2015/8/18

Y1 - 2015/8/18

N2 - Bottom-up assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles exhibit unique optical effects such as tunable reflection, optical cavity modes, and tunable photonic resonances. Here, we compare detailed simulations with experiment to explore the effect of structural inhomogeneity on the optical response in DNA-gold nanoparticle superlattices. In particular, we explore the effect of background environment, nanoparticle polydispersity (>10%), and variation in nanoparticle placement (∼5%). At volume fractions less than 20% Au, the optical response is insensitive to particle size, defects, and inhomogeneity in the superlattice. At elevated volume fractions (20% and 25%), structures incorporating different sized nanoparticles (10-, 20-, and 40-nm diameter) each exhibit distinct far-field extinction and near-field properties. These optical properties are most pronounced in lattices with larger particles, which at fixed volume fraction have greater plasmonic coupling than those with smaller particles. Moreover, the incorporation of experimentally informed inhomogeneity leads to variation in far-field extinction and inconsistent electric-field intensities throughout the lattice, demonstrating that volume fraction is not sufficient to describe the optical properties of such structures. These data have important implications for understanding the role of particle and lattice inhomogeneity in determining the properties of plasmonic nanoparticle lattices with deliberately designed optical properties.

AB - Bottom-up assemblies of plasmonic nanoparticles exhibit unique optical effects such as tunable reflection, optical cavity modes, and tunable photonic resonances. Here, we compare detailed simulations with experiment to explore the effect of structural inhomogeneity on the optical response in DNA-gold nanoparticle superlattices. In particular, we explore the effect of background environment, nanoparticle polydispersity (>10%), and variation in nanoparticle placement (∼5%). At volume fractions less than 20% Au, the optical response is insensitive to particle size, defects, and inhomogeneity in the superlattice. At elevated volume fractions (20% and 25%), structures incorporating different sized nanoparticles (10-, 20-, and 40-nm diameter) each exhibit distinct far-field extinction and near-field properties. These optical properties are most pronounced in lattices with larger particles, which at fixed volume fraction have greater plasmonic coupling than those with smaller particles. Moreover, the incorporation of experimentally informed inhomogeneity leads to variation in far-field extinction and inconsistent electric-field intensities throughout the lattice, demonstrating that volume fraction is not sufficient to describe the optical properties of such structures. These data have important implications for understanding the role of particle and lattice inhomogeneity in determining the properties of plasmonic nanoparticle lattices with deliberately designed optical properties.

KW - Disorder

KW - DNA

KW - Nanoparticle

KW - Noble metal

KW - Plasmonics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939864451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939864451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1513058112

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1513058112

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 10292

EP - 10297

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 33

ER -