Diamond growth on carbide surfaces using a selective etching technique

K. J. Grannen, Robert P. H. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond films on silicon carbide and tungsten carbide (with 6% cobalt) surfaces using fluorocarbon gases has been demonstrated. No diamond powder pretreatment is necessary to grow these films with a (100) faceted surface morphology. The diamond films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The proposed nucleation and growth mechanism involves etching of the noncarbon component of the carbide by atomic fluorine to expose surface carbon atoms and diamond nucleation and growth on these exposed carbon atoms. Hydrogen is necessary in the growth process to limit the rapid etching of the carbide substrates by corrosive fluorine atoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2154-2163
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Materials Research
Volume9
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1994

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Diamond
carbides
Carbides
Etching
Diamonds
Fluorine
diamonds
Diamond films
etching
diamond films
Atoms
fluorine
Nucleation
Carbon
nucleation
atoms
Fluorocarbons
Caustics
tungsten carbides
Tungsten carbide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Diamond growth on carbide surfaces using a selective etching technique. / Grannen, K. J.; Chang, Robert P. H.

In: Journal of Materials Research, Vol. 9, No. 8, 08.1994, p. 2154-2163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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