DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization

Sung Yong Park, Abigail K R Lytton-Jean, Byeongdu Lee, Steven Weigand, George C Schatz, Chad A. Mirkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1050 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It was first shown more than ten years ago that DNA oligonucleotides can be attached to gold nanoparticles rationally to direct the formation of larger assemblies. Since then, oligonucleotide-functionalized nanoparticles have been developed into powerful diagnostic tools for nucleic acids and proteins, and into intracellular probes and gene regulators. In contrast, the conceptually simple yet powerful idea that functionalized nanoparticles might serve as basic building blocks that can be rationally assembled through programmable base-pairing interactions into highly ordered macroscopic materials remains poorly developed. So far, the approach has mainly resulted in polymerization, with modest control over the placement of, the periodicity in, and the distance between particles within the assembled material. That is, most of the materials obtained thus far are best classified as amorphous polymers, although a few examples of colloidal crystal formation exist. Here, we demonstrate that DNA can be used to control the crystallization of nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates to the extent that different DNA sequences guide the assembly of the same type of inorganic nanoparticle into different crystalline states. We show that the choice of DNA sequences attached to the nanoparticle building blocks, the DNA linking molecules and the absence or presence of a non-bonding single-base flexor can be adjusted so that gold nanoparticles assemble into micrometre-sized face-centred-cubic or body-centred-cubic crystal structures. Our findings thus clearly demonstrate that synthetically programmable colloidal crystallization is possible, and that a single-component system can be directed to form different structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)553-556
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume451
Issue number7178
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 31 2008

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Crystallization
Nanoparticles
DNA
Oligonucleotides
Gold
Periodicity
Regulator Genes
Base Pairing
Polymerization
Nucleic Acids
Polymers
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Park, S. Y., Lytton-Jean, A. K. R., Lee, B., Weigand, S., Schatz, G. C., & Mirkin, C. A. (2008). DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization. Nature, 451(7178), 553-556. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06508

DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization. / Park, Sung Yong; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Lee, Byeongdu; Weigand, Steven; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A.

In: Nature, Vol. 451, No. 7178, 31.01.2008, p. 553-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, SY, Lytton-Jean, AKR, Lee, B, Weigand, S, Schatz, GC & Mirkin, CA 2008, 'DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization', Nature, vol. 451, no. 7178, pp. 553-556. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06508
Park SY, Lytton-Jean AKR, Lee B, Weigand S, Schatz GC, Mirkin CA. DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization. Nature. 2008 Jan 31;451(7178):553-556. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06508
Park, Sung Yong ; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R ; Lee, Byeongdu ; Weigand, Steven ; Schatz, George C ; Mirkin, Chad A. / DNA-programmable nanoparticle crystallization. In: Nature. 2008 ; Vol. 451, No. 7178. pp. 553-556.
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