EFFECT OF ELECTRODE PLACEMENT AND FINITE MATRIX CONDUCTIVITY ON THE PERFORMANCE OF FLOW-THROUGH POROUS ELECTRODES.

James A Trainham, John Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A one-dimensional model for flow-through porous electrodes is used to predict the effluent concentration as a function of matrix conductivity and electrode length for upstream and downstream placement of the counterelectrode and current collector relative to the fluid inlet to the working electrode. Two chemical systems are considered: (i) the removal of copper from sulfate solutions, and (ii) the removal of silver from thiosulfate solutions. For an infinite matrix conductivity, the lowest effluent concentration is achieved when the counterelectrode is placed upstream to the fluid inlet of the working electrode. When the matrix conductivity is small, the lowest effluent concentration is still achieved for upstream placement of the counterelectrode; however, the optimum placement of the current collector depends on the chemical system and the value of the matrix conductivity that can be achieved in practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-68
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume125
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1978

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effluents
upstream
Effluents
conductivity
Electrodes
electrodes
matrices
accumulators
Copper Sulfate
Fluids
fluids
sulfates
Silver
silver
Copper
copper

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrochemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

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title = "EFFECT OF ELECTRODE PLACEMENT AND FINITE MATRIX CONDUCTIVITY ON THE PERFORMANCE OF FLOW-THROUGH POROUS ELECTRODES.",
abstract = "A one-dimensional model for flow-through porous electrodes is used to predict the effluent concentration as a function of matrix conductivity and electrode length for upstream and downstream placement of the counterelectrode and current collector relative to the fluid inlet to the working electrode. Two chemical systems are considered: (i) the removal of copper from sulfate solutions, and (ii) the removal of silver from thiosulfate solutions. For an infinite matrix conductivity, the lowest effluent concentration is achieved when the counterelectrode is placed upstream to the fluid inlet of the working electrode. When the matrix conductivity is small, the lowest effluent concentration is still achieved for upstream placement of the counterelectrode; however, the optimum placement of the current collector depends on the chemical system and the value of the matrix conductivity that can be achieved in practice.",
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AB - A one-dimensional model for flow-through porous electrodes is used to predict the effluent concentration as a function of matrix conductivity and electrode length for upstream and downstream placement of the counterelectrode and current collector relative to the fluid inlet to the working electrode. Two chemical systems are considered: (i) the removal of copper from sulfate solutions, and (ii) the removal of silver from thiosulfate solutions. For an infinite matrix conductivity, the lowest effluent concentration is achieved when the counterelectrode is placed upstream to the fluid inlet of the working electrode. When the matrix conductivity is small, the lowest effluent concentration is still achieved for upstream placement of the counterelectrode; however, the optimum placement of the current collector depends on the chemical system and the value of the matrix conductivity that can be achieved in practice.

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