Electrodynamics in computational chemistry

Linlin Zhao, Shengli Zou, Encai Hao, George C Schatz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter gives a synoptic view on the interaction of light with particles that are sufficiently large in size that classical electrodynamics can be used to describe the optical properties of the particle. Most of the review is concerned with metal nanoparticles (silver and gold), where the linear optical properties (extinction, absorption, and scattering) are strongly dependent on particle size, shape, and local dielectric environment. To describe such problems, there has been much recent progress in the use of computational electrodynamics methods including the discrete dipole approximation, the finite difference time domain method, and other methods, and one can review recent applications of these methods that have been used to interpret the experiments. The chapter describes the development of electronic structure methods for describing the Raman spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the metal particles, including methods that explicitly include the electric fields from classical electrodynamics calculations in the calculation of Raman intensities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTheory and Applications of Computational Chemistry
PublisherElsevier
Pages47-65
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9780444517197
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Computational chemistry
Electrodynamics
Optical properties
Metal nanoparticles
Finite difference time domain method
Silver
Gold
Electronic structure
Raman scattering
Metals
Particle size
Electric fields
Scattering
Molecules
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Zhao, L., Zou, S., Hao, E., & Schatz, G. C. (2005). Electrodynamics in computational chemistry. In Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry (pp. 47-65). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0

Electrodynamics in computational chemistry. / Zhao, Linlin; Zou, Shengli; Hao, Encai; Schatz, George C.

Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry. Elsevier, 2005. p. 47-65.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Zhao, L, Zou, S, Hao, E & Schatz, GC 2005, Electrodynamics in computational chemistry. in Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry. Elsevier, pp. 47-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0
Zhao L, Zou S, Hao E, Schatz GC. Electrodynamics in computational chemistry. In Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry. Elsevier. 2005. p. 47-65 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0
Zhao, Linlin ; Zou, Shengli ; Hao, Encai ; Schatz, George C. / Electrodynamics in computational chemistry. Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry. Elsevier, 2005. pp. 47-65
@inbook{e701a034b3fb43ab8aac39fd44a192fc,
title = "Electrodynamics in computational chemistry",
abstract = "This chapter gives a synoptic view on the interaction of light with particles that are sufficiently large in size that classical electrodynamics can be used to describe the optical properties of the particle. Most of the review is concerned with metal nanoparticles (silver and gold), where the linear optical properties (extinction, absorption, and scattering) are strongly dependent on particle size, shape, and local dielectric environment. To describe such problems, there has been much recent progress in the use of computational electrodynamics methods including the discrete dipole approximation, the finite difference time domain method, and other methods, and one can review recent applications of these methods that have been used to interpret the experiments. The chapter describes the development of electronic structure methods for describing the Raman spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the metal particles, including methods that explicitly include the electric fields from classical electrodynamics calculations in the calculation of Raman intensities.",
author = "Linlin Zhao and Shengli Zou and Encai Hao and Schatz, {George C}",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780444517197",
pages = "47--65",
booktitle = "Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Electrodynamics in computational chemistry

AU - Zhao, Linlin

AU - Zou, Shengli

AU - Hao, Encai

AU - Schatz, George C

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - This chapter gives a synoptic view on the interaction of light with particles that are sufficiently large in size that classical electrodynamics can be used to describe the optical properties of the particle. Most of the review is concerned with metal nanoparticles (silver and gold), where the linear optical properties (extinction, absorption, and scattering) are strongly dependent on particle size, shape, and local dielectric environment. To describe such problems, there has been much recent progress in the use of computational electrodynamics methods including the discrete dipole approximation, the finite difference time domain method, and other methods, and one can review recent applications of these methods that have been used to interpret the experiments. The chapter describes the development of electronic structure methods for describing the Raman spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the metal particles, including methods that explicitly include the electric fields from classical electrodynamics calculations in the calculation of Raman intensities.

AB - This chapter gives a synoptic view on the interaction of light with particles that are sufficiently large in size that classical electrodynamics can be used to describe the optical properties of the particle. Most of the review is concerned with metal nanoparticles (silver and gold), where the linear optical properties (extinction, absorption, and scattering) are strongly dependent on particle size, shape, and local dielectric environment. To describe such problems, there has been much recent progress in the use of computational electrodynamics methods including the discrete dipole approximation, the finite difference time domain method, and other methods, and one can review recent applications of these methods that have been used to interpret the experiments. The chapter describes the development of electronic structure methods for describing the Raman spectra of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the metal particles, including methods that explicitly include the electric fields from classical electrodynamics calculations in the calculation of Raman intensities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149089655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149089655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0

DO - 10.1016/B978-044451719-7/50047-0

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780444517197

SP - 47

EP - 65

BT - Theory and Applications of Computational Chemistry

PB - Elsevier

ER -