Electron conduction in molecular wires. II. Application to scanning tunneling microscopy

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Abstract

We use scattering methods to calculate the conductance of molecular wires. We show that three kinds of wire length dependences of the conductance arise: the decay can be exponential, polynomial, or very slow, depending on whether the reservoir Fermi level lies far from, in, or at the edge of the molecular energy band. We use the formalism to discuss simple models of tip-induced pressure and of imaging in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and point out a paradoxical situation in which the current can decrease with increased tip pressure. We also consider the connection of this formalism with the conventional theory of intramolecular, nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6856-6864
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Chemical Physics
Volume101
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Scanning tunneling microscopy
conduction electrons
scanning tunneling microscopy
wire
Wire
formalism
Electrons
Fermi level
Band structure
energy bands
electron transfer
polynomials
Polynomials
Scattering
Imaging techniques
decay
scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Electron conduction in molecular wires. II. Application to scanning tunneling microscopy. / Mujica, Vladimiro; Kemp, M.; Ratner, Mark A.

In: Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 101, No. 8, 1994, p. 6856-6864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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