Engendering Long-Term Air and Light Stability of a TiO2-Supported Porphyrinic Dye via Atomic Layer Deposition

William L. Hoffeditz, Ho Jin Son, Michael J. Pellin, Omar K. Farha, Joseph T Hupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Organic and porphyrin-based chromophores are prevalent in liquid-junction photovoltaic and photocatalytic solar-cell chemistry; however, their long-term air and light instability may limit their practicality in real world technologies. Here, we describe the protection of a zinc porphyrin dye, adsorbed on nanoparticulate TiO2, from air and light degradation by a protective coating of alumina grown with a previously developed post-treatment atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The protective Al2O3 ALD layer is deposited using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide as an Al source; in contrast to the ubiquitous ALD precursor trimethylaluminum, dimethylaluminum isopropoxide does not degrade the zinc porphyrin dye, as confirmed by UV-vis measurements. The growth of this protective ALD layer around the dye can be monitored by an in-reactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Furthermore, greater than 80% of porphyrin light absorption is retained over ∼1 month of exposure to air and light when the protective coating is present, whereas almost complete loss of porphyrin absorption is observed in less than 2 days in the absence of the ALD protective layer. Applying the Al2O3 post-treatment technique to the TiO2-adsorbed dye allows the dye to remain in electronic contact with both the semiconductor surface and a surrounding electrolyte solution, the combination of which makes this technique promising for numerous other electrochemical photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications, especially those involving the dye-sensitized evolution of oxygen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34863-34869
Number of pages7
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume8
Issue number50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 21 2016

Fingerprint

Atomic layer deposition
Porphyrins
Coloring Agents
Dyes
Air
Protective coatings
Zinc
Aluminum Oxide
Quartz crystal microbalances
Chromophores
Light absorption
Electrolytes
Solar cells
Alumina
Semiconductor materials
Oxygen
Degradation
Liquids

Keywords

  • atomic layer deposition
  • dimethylaluminum isopropoxide
  • dye enshroudment
  • increased dye stability
  • porphyrin dye
  • protective coating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Engendering Long-Term Air and Light Stability of a TiO2-Supported Porphyrinic Dye via Atomic Layer Deposition. / Hoffeditz, William L.; Son, Ho Jin; Pellin, Michael J.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 8, No. 50, 21.12.2016, p. 34863-34869.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoffeditz, William L. ; Son, Ho Jin ; Pellin, Michael J. ; Farha, Omar K. ; Hupp, Joseph T. / Engendering Long-Term Air and Light Stability of a TiO2-Supported Porphyrinic Dye via Atomic Layer Deposition. In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 50. pp. 34863-34869.
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