Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries

Xin Zhao, Cary M. Hayner, Mayfair C. Kung, Harold H Kung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The development of more efficient energy conversion and storage devices remains a pressing need in attempting to achieve a high level of market penetration of electric vehicles and use of intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind and solar energy. Current lithium-ion batteries, although an attractive energy storage device, have limited charge capacity that diminishes rapidly at high charge/discharge rates. We have shown previously that a Si-graphene composite integrated into a 3-dimensional, conducting graphitic network offers high structural and cycling stability and substantially higher charge capacity as an anode material than graphite. However, the composite suffers from the problem of diminishing charge capacity during high current operations. Here, we report a facile microscopic engineering strategy to enhance the Li ion transport in graphene sheets, which could be utilized as a platform to create high-power battery materials. When used with Si nanoparticles to form a Si-graphene composite and integrating the composite into a 3-dimensional graphitic network to form a self-supporting electrode paper, the electrode exhibits an outstanding energy density-power density combination, without compromising the usable lifetime and mechanical flexibility. The power capability was found to be comparable to supercapacitors but with a much higher energy density. For example, a charge capacity of over 1000 mAh/g was achieved at a discharge rate of 8 A/g. Structural characterization by high resolution electron microscopy and impedance measurements provided evidence that relates the structural properties to the Li ion diffusivity for this material, which can bridge the performance disparity between batteries with high energy density and capacitors with high power density.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2011Oct 21 2011

Other

Other2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period10/16/1110/21/11

Fingerprint

Graphite
Lithium
Graphene
Ions
Composite materials
Energy storage
Electrodes
High resolution electron microscopy
Electric vehicles
Energy conversion
Solar energy
Wind power
Structural properties
Anodes
Capacitors
Nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Zhao, X., Hayner, C. M., Kung, M. C., & Kung, H. H. (2011). Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries. In 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings

Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries. / Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.

11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Zhao, X, Hayner, CM, Kung, MC & Kung, HH 2011, Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries. in 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, 11AIChE, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 10/16/11.
Zhao X, Hayner CM, Kung MC, Kung HH. Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries. In 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011
Zhao, Xin ; Hayner, Cary M. ; Kung, Mayfair C. ; Kung, Harold H. / Engineered Si-graphene composite papers with enhanced lithium ion transport for high-power batteries. 11AIChE - 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2011.
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