Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals

Stacey N. Barnaby, Michael B. Ross, Ryan V. Thaner, Byeongdu Lee, George C Schatz, Chad A. Mirkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In atomic systems, the mixing of metals results in distinct phase behavior that depends on the identity and bonding characteristics of the atoms. In nanoscale systems, the use of oligonucleotides as programmable "bonds" that link nanoparticle "atoms" into superlattices allows for the decoupling of atom identity and bonding. While much research in atomic systems is dedicated to understanding different phase behavior of mixed metals, it is not well understood on the nanoscale how changes in the nanoscale "bond" affect the phase behavior of nanoparticle crystals. In this work, the identity of the atom is kept the same, but the chemical nature of the bond is altered, which is not possible in atomic systems, through the use of DNA and RNA bonding elements. These building blocks assemble into single crystal nanoparticle superlattices with mixed DNA and RNA bonding elements throughout. The nanoparticle crystals can be dynamically changed through the selective and enzymatic hydrolysis of the RNA bonding elements, resulting in superlattices that retain their crystalline structure and habit, while incorporating up to 35% random vacancies generated from the nanoparticles removed. Therefore, the bonding elements of nanoparticle crystals can be enzymatically and selectively addressed without affecting the nature of the atom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5114-5119
Number of pages6
JournalNano Letters
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 10 2016

Fingerprint

Vacancies
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
Crystals
Superlattices
Phase behavior
Atoms
RNA
crystals
superlattices
atoms
DNA
deoxyribonucleic acid
Metals
Enzymatic hydrolysis
oligonucleotides
Oligonucleotides
habits
decoupling
metals

Keywords

  • crystals
  • enzymes
  • nanoparticles
  • RNA
  • Superlattices
  • vacancies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Barnaby, S. N., Ross, M. B., Thaner, R. V., Lee, B., Schatz, G. C., & Mirkin, C. A. (2016). Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals. Nano Letters, 16(8), 5114-5119. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b02042

Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals. / Barnaby, Stacey N.; Ross, Michael B.; Thaner, Ryan V.; Lee, Byeongdu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A.

In: Nano Letters, Vol. 16, No. 8, 10.08.2016, p. 5114-5119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barnaby, SN, Ross, MB, Thaner, RV, Lee, B, Schatz, GC & Mirkin, CA 2016, 'Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals', Nano Letters, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 5114-5119. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b02042
Barnaby, Stacey N. ; Ross, Michael B. ; Thaner, Ryan V. ; Lee, Byeongdu ; Schatz, George C ; Mirkin, Chad A. / Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals. In: Nano Letters. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 8. pp. 5114-5119.
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