Materials for organic and hybrid inorganic/organic electronics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Materials scientists involved in synthesis are exceptionally skilled at designing and constructing individual molecules with the goal of introducing rationally tailored chemical and physical properties. However, the task of assembling such special molecules into organized, supramolecular structures with precise, nanometer-level organizational control to execute specific functions presents a daunting challenge. Soft and hard matter suitable for unconventional types of electronic circuitry represents a case in point and, in principal, offer capabilities not readily achievable with conventional silicon electronics. In this context, "unconventional" means circuitry that can span large areas, can be mechanically flexible and/or optically transparent, can be created by large-scale, high-throughput fabrication techniques, and has atomic-level tunability of properties. In the process of preparing, characterizing, and fabricating prototype devices with such materials, we learn many new things about the electronic and electrical properties of the materials and the interfaces between them. This account briefly overviews recent progress in three interconnected areas: (1) organic semiconductors for complementary π-electron circuits, (2) soft matter high-K gate dielectrics for organic and inorganic electronics, and (3) metal-oxide semiconductors as components in such devices. Space limitations allow only touching upon selected highlights in this burgeoning field.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1018-1027
Number of pages10
JournalMRS Bulletin
Volume35
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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Electronic equipment
electronics
Molecules
Semiconducting organic compounds
Gate dielectrics
Level control
Silicon
Electronic properties
Chemical properties
organic semiconductors
Electric properties
Physical properties
assembling
Metals
Throughput
metal oxide semiconductors
chemical properties
Fabrication
molecules
Electrons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Materials for organic and hybrid inorganic/organic electronics. / Marks, Tobin J.

In: MRS Bulletin, Vol. 35, No. 12, 12.2010, p. 1018-1027.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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