Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks

Thomas D. Bennett, Yuanzheng Yue, Peng Li, Ang Qiao, Haizheng Tao, Neville G. Greaves, Tom Richards, Giulio I. Lampronti, Simon A T Redfern, Frédéric Blanc, Omar K. Farha, Joseph T Hupp, Anthony K. Cheetham, David A. Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. In this work, we give due consideration to framework chemistry and topology to expand the phenomenon of the melting of 3D MOFs, linking crystal chemistry to framework melting temperature and kinetic fragility of the glass-forming liquids. Here we show that melting temperatures can be lowered by altering the chemistry of the crystalline MOF state, which provides a route to facilitate the melting of other MOFs. The glasses formed upon vitrification are chemically and structurally distinct from the three other existing categories of melt-quenched glasses (inorganic nonmetallic, organic, and metallic), and retain the basic metal-ligand connectivity of crystalline MOFs, which connects their mechanical properties to their starting chemical composition. The transfer of functionality from crystal to glass points toward new routes to tunable, functional hybrid glasses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3484-3492
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume138
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 16 2016

Fingerprint

Glass
Metals
Freezing
Crystalline materials
Temperature
Melting point
Melting
Crystal chemistry
Vitrification
Liquids
Pyrolysis
Hot Temperature
Ligands
Topology
Mechanical properties
Crystals
Kinetics
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Bennett, T. D., Yue, Y., Li, P., Qiao, A., Tao, H., Greaves, N. G., ... Keen, D. A. (2016). Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 138(10), 3484-3492. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b13220

Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks. / Bennett, Thomas D.; Yue, Yuanzheng; Li, Peng; Qiao, Ang; Tao, Haizheng; Greaves, Neville G.; Richards, Tom; Lampronti, Giulio I.; Redfern, Simon A T; Blanc, Frédéric; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T; Cheetham, Anthony K.; Keen, David A.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 138, No. 10, 16.03.2016, p. 3484-3492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, TD, Yue, Y, Li, P, Qiao, A, Tao, H, Greaves, NG, Richards, T, Lampronti, GI, Redfern, SAT, Blanc, F, Farha, OK, Hupp, JT, Cheetham, AK & Keen, DA 2016, 'Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 138, no. 10, pp. 3484-3492. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b13220
Bennett TD, Yue Y, Li P, Qiao A, Tao H, Greaves NG et al. Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2016 Mar 16;138(10):3484-3492. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b13220
Bennett, Thomas D. ; Yue, Yuanzheng ; Li, Peng ; Qiao, Ang ; Tao, Haizheng ; Greaves, Neville G. ; Richards, Tom ; Lampronti, Giulio I. ; Redfern, Simon A T ; Blanc, Frédéric ; Farha, Omar K. ; Hupp, Joseph T ; Cheetham, Anthony K. ; Keen, David A. / Melt-Quenched Glasses of Metal-Organic Frameworks. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2016 ; Vol. 138, No. 10. pp. 3484-3492.
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