Metal-organic frameworks as H2 storage materials

Implications of cation doping on uptake and binding

Karen L. Mulfort, Joseph T Hupp

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received considerable attention as potential H2 storage materials. However, despite the nearly limitless structural possibilities of MOFs, none have yet succeeded in reaching relevant uptake standards. To further understand the factors necessary for strong H2 binding within MOF materials, we have pursued cation doping and inclusion as a strategy to create highly favorable binding sites. Here we describe the first experimental studies of cation insertion into MOF materials through the ligand functionality. Chemical reduction of the ligand and inclusion of charge-balancing cations has indeed resulted in nearly doubling the H2 uptake, though most likely attributable to dynamic structural behavior as opposed to direct H2-cation interaction. Li+ and Mg2+ alkoxide formation at pendant hydroxyl sites within the pores has also resulted moderate increases in uptake. Notably, the H2 binding affinity exhibits an unusual trend with loading that suggests direct H2-cation interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009 - Washington, DC, United States
Duration: Aug 16 2009Aug 20 2009

Other

Other238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009
CountryUnited States
CityWashington, DC
Period8/16/098/20/09

Fingerprint

Cations
Positive ions
Metals
Doping (additives)
Ligands
Structural dynamics
Binding sites
Hydroxyl Radical
Binding Sites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Metal-organic frameworks as H2 storage materials : Implications of cation doping on uptake and binding. / Mulfort, Karen L.; Hupp, Joseph T.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mulfort, KL & Hupp, JT 2009, Metal-organic frameworks as H2 storage materials: Implications of cation doping on uptake and binding. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 238th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009, Washington, DC, United States, 8/16/09.
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