Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide

Vinod K. Sangwan, Hong Sub Lee, Hadallia Bergeron, Itamar Balla, Megan E. Beck, Kan Sheng Chen, Mark C Hersam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memristors are two-terminal passive circuit elements that have been developed for use in non-volatile resistive random-access memory and may also be useful in neuromorphic computing. Memristors have higher endurance and faster read/write times than flash memory and can provide multi-bit data storage. However, although two-terminal memristors have demonstrated capacity for basic neural functions, synapses in the human brain outnumber neurons by more than a thousandfold, which implies that multi-terminal memristors are needed to perform complex functions such as heterosynaptic plasticity. Previous attempts to move beyond two-terminal memristors, such as the three-terminal Widrow-Hoff memristor and field-effect transistors with nanoionic gates or floating gates, did not achieve memristive switching in the transistor. Here we report the experimental realization of a multi-terminal hybrid memristor and transistor (that is, a memtransistor) using polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in a scalable fabrication process. The two-dimensional MoS2 memtransistors show gate tunability in individual resistance states by four orders of magnitude, as well as large switching ratios, high cycling endurance and long-term retention of states. In addition to conventional neural learning behaviour of long-term potentiation/depression, six-terminal MoS2 memtransistors have gate-tunable heterosynaptic functionality, which is not achievable using two-terminal memristors. For example, the conductance between a pair of floating electrodes (pre- and post-synaptic neurons) is varied by a factor of about ten by applying voltage pulses to modulatory terminals. In situ scanning probe microscopy, cryogenic charge transport measurements and device modelling reveal that the bias-induced motion of MoS2 defects drives resistive switching by dynamically varying Schottky barrier heights. Overall, the seamless integration of a memristor and transistor into one multi-terminal device could enable complex neuromorphic learning and the study of the physics of defect kinetics in two-dimensional materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)500-504
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume554
Issue number7693
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 21 2018

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molybdenum disulfides
transistors
endurance
neurons
floating
learning
synapses
random access memory
defects
data storage
plastic properties
cryogenics
brain
flash
field effect transistors
microscopy
cycles
fabrication
physics
scanning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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Sangwan, V. K., Lee, H. S., Bergeron, H., Balla, I., Beck, M. E., Chen, K. S., & Hersam, M. C. (2018). Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide. Nature, 554(7693), 500-504. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature25747

Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide. / Sangwan, Vinod K.; Lee, Hong Sub; Bergeron, Hadallia; Balla, Itamar; Beck, Megan E.; Chen, Kan Sheng; Hersam, Mark C.

In: Nature, Vol. 554, No. 7693, 21.02.2018, p. 500-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sangwan, VK, Lee, HS, Bergeron, H, Balla, I, Beck, ME, Chen, KS & Hersam, MC 2018, 'Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide', Nature, vol. 554, no. 7693, pp. 500-504. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature25747
Sangwan VK, Lee HS, Bergeron H, Balla I, Beck ME, Chen KS et al. Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide. Nature. 2018 Feb 21;554(7693):500-504. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature25747
Sangwan, Vinod K. ; Lee, Hong Sub ; Bergeron, Hadallia ; Balla, Itamar ; Beck, Megan E. ; Chen, Kan Sheng ; Hersam, Mark C. / Multi-terminal memtransistors from polycrystalline monolayer molybdenum disulfide. In: Nature. 2018 ; Vol. 554, No. 7693. pp. 500-504.
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