Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex

Yuichi Terazono, Gerdenis Kodis, Paul A. Liddell, Vikas Garg, Thomas A Moore, Ana L Moore, John Devens Gust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to ∼650 nm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7147-7155
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume113
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 21 2009

Fingerprint

Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins
Porphyrins
Fullerenes
porphyrins
Antennas
antennas
fullerenes
Excited states
excitation
Electrons
Excitation energy
Anthracene
Quantum yield
Chromophores
funnels
electrons
Energy transfer
solar spectra
polarization (charge separation)
anthracene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex. / Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A.; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, John Devens.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 113, No. 20, 21.05.2009, p. 7147-7155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terazono, Yuichi ; Kodis, Gerdenis ; Liddell, Paul A. ; Garg, Vikas ; Moore, Thomas A ; Moore, Ana L ; Gust, John Devens. / Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2009 ; Vol. 113, No. 20. pp. 7147-7155.
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