Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice

Yonggang Ke, Shawn M. Douglas, Minghui Liu, Jaswinder Sharma, Anchi Cheng, Albert Leung, Yan Liu, William M. Shih, Hao Yan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

220 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Molecular self-assembly using DNA as a structural building block has proven to be an efficient route to the construction of nanoscale objects and arrays of increasing complexity. Using the remarkable "scaffolded DNA origami" strategy, Rothemund demonstrated that a long single-stranded DNA from a viral genome (M13) can be folded into a variety of custom two-dimensional (2D) shapes using hundreds of short synthetic DNA molecules as staple strands. More recently, we generalized a strategy to build customshaped, three-dimensional (3D) objects formed as pleated layers of helices constrained to a honeycomb lattice, with precisely controlled dimensions ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Here we describe a more compact design for 3D origami, with layers of helices packed on a square lattice, that can be folded successfully into structures of designed dimensions in a one-step annealing process, despite the increased density of DNA helices. A square lattice provides a more natural framework for designing rectangular structures, the option for a more densely packed architecture, and the ability to create surfaces that are more flat than is possible with the honeycomb lattice. Thus enabling the design and construction of custom 3D shapes from helices packed on a square lattice provides a general foundational advance for increasing the versatility and scope of DNA nanotechnology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15903-15908
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume131
Issue number43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 4 2009

Fingerprint

Multilayers
DNA
Nanotechnology
Viral Genome
Single-Stranded DNA
Self assembly
Genes
Annealing
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Ke, Y., Douglas, S. M., Liu, M., Sharma, J., Cheng, A., Leung, A., ... Yan, H. (2009). Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(43), 15903-15908. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja906381y

Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice. / Ke, Yonggang; Douglas, Shawn M.; Liu, Minghui; Sharma, Jaswinder; Cheng, Anchi; Leung, Albert; Liu, Yan; Shih, William M.; Yan, Hao.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 131, No. 43, 04.11.2009, p. 15903-15908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ke, Y, Douglas, SM, Liu, M, Sharma, J, Cheng, A, Leung, A, Liu, Y, Shih, WM & Yan, H 2009, 'Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 131, no. 43, pp. 15903-15908. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja906381y
Ke Y, Douglas SM, Liu M, Sharma J, Cheng A, Leung A et al. Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2009 Nov 4;131(43):15903-15908. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja906381y
Ke, Yonggang ; Douglas, Shawn M. ; Liu, Minghui ; Sharma, Jaswinder ; Cheng, Anchi ; Leung, Albert ; Liu, Yan ; Shih, William M. ; Yan, Hao. / Multilayer DNA origami packed on a square lattice. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2009 ; Vol. 131, No. 43. pp. 15903-15908.
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