Nature's renewable energy blueprint

Future fuel from biomimics and microbial cell factories

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Significant advances in renewable H¬2 production from water and sunlight are happening using two different bioinspired approaches. We are using a salt-tolerant strain of cyanobacteria as cell factory to produce H2 from water and sunlight (http://www.princeton.edu/~biosolar/). Ongoing improvements in the yield of dark fermentative hydrogen formed via the hydrogenase pathway has achieved a 40-fold improvement, and currently equals the best photo-H2 yields reported for green algae. Using new analytical tools developed for this research, the intracellular pathways that produce H2 have been elucidated, thereby opening the door to rational genetic engineering approaches for further improvements (in progress). Strongly oxidizing inorganic materials, inspired by the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving enzyme, have been synthesized possessing the cubical [Mn4O4]7+ core type. A collaborative team has discovered methods for activating these cores for sustained photo-assisted electro-oxidation of water. We are working toward applications of these inexpensive catalysts as replacement for platinum in solar photoelectrochemical cells.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event233rd ACS National Meeting - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Mar 25 2007Mar 29 2007

Other

Other233rd ACS National Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period3/25/073/29/07

Fingerprint

Blueprints
Industrial plants
Water
Photoelectrochemical cells
Hydrogenase
Genetic engineering
Photosystem II Protein Complex
Electrooxidation
Algae
Platinum
Hydrogen
Salts
Catalysts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Nature's renewable energy blueprint : Future fuel from biomimics and microbial cell factories. / Dismukes, G. Charles.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2007.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dismukes, GC 2007, Nature's renewable energy blueprint: Future fuel from biomimics and microbial cell factories. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 233rd ACS National Meeting, Chicago, IL, United States, 3/25/07.
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