Photoeffects in thin film chromophore-quencher assemblies

variations in the light absorber

Joseph T Hupp, Thomas J. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The abilities of a variety of inorganic and organic compounds to act as electron transfer quenchable light absorbers in thin polymeric films have been examined. The compounds, each of which contains a primary amine, were chemically bound in precast chlorosulfonated polystyrene films by sulfonamide bond formation. Visible photolysis of the films in the presence of an oxidative quencher and a reductive scavenger leads to a sustained photocurrent response from 14 of the 18 compounds studied. Differences in the photocurrent output as the chromophore is changed can be explained qualitatively based on a kinetic model whose key steps are optical excitation of the absorber followed by excited state electron transfer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-433
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry
Volume48
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Chromophores
Photocurrents
assemblies
chromophores
photocurrents
absorbers
electron transfer
Inorganic compounds
inorganic compounds
Thin films
polymeric films
Electrons
Photoexcitation
Polystyrenes
Sulfonamides
Photolysis
thin films
organic compounds
Organic compounds
Polymer films

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Photoeffects in thin film chromophore-quencher assemblies : variations in the light absorber. / Hupp, Joseph T; Meyer, Thomas J.

In: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, Vol. 48, No. 2-3, 1989, p. 419-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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