Photosystem I

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter discusseses PS I in detail. Chlamydomonas has been an incredibly powerful and productive platform from which to study PS I. PS I is composed of 14 polypeptides and its core cofactors are explained in depth. Energy transfers within, from PS I and to other cell is also elaborated. After a shift of the mutant to the nonpermissive temperature, PS I remained stable, indicating that the effect was upon assembly. PS I can be thought of as a light-driven electron pump, transferring electrons from plastocyanin (or cytochrome c 6) on the lumenal side to ferredoxin on the stromal side, both across the thylakoid membrane and over an energy barrier. PS I can function as part of the linear or cyclic electron transport pathways. The resemblance of PS I from this organism to that of higher plants also allows the study of questions that would not be easy or possible in either plants or cyanobacteria. These include: the mechanisms by which external antenna proteins attach to the PS I, and how these interactions are regulated; the structural arrangement of these antenna proteins with PS I, and how these relate to pathways of excitation quenching; and the role of specialized membrane domains in the function of PS I.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages541-572
Number of pages32
Volume2
ISBN (Print)9780123708731
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Photosystem I Protein Complex
photosystem I
antennae
Plastocyanin
electrons
Electrons
plastocyanin
Chlamydomonas
Ferredoxins
Thylakoids
ferredoxins
cytochrome c
Energy Transfer
Cyanobacteria
energy transfer
Electron Transport
Cytochromes c
thylakoids
pumps
electron transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Redding, K. E. (2009). Photosystem I. In The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set (Vol. 2, pp. 541-572). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-370873-1.00023-X

Photosystem I. / Redding, Kevin Edward.

The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2009. p. 541-572.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Redding, KE 2009, Photosystem I. in The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set. vol. 2, Elsevier Inc., pp. 541-572. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-370873-1.00023-X
Redding KE. Photosystem I. In The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set. Vol. 2. Elsevier Inc. 2009. p. 541-572 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-370873-1.00023-X
Redding, Kevin Edward. / Photosystem I. The Chlamydomonas Sourcebook 3-Vol set. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2009. pp. 541-572
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