Properties of diamond composite films grown on iron surfaces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report for the first time that diamond composite films consisting of diamond particles, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, and/or fluorocarbon films can be successfully deposited on carbon steel and 304 stainless-steel substrates by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The use of thin (∼200 Å) silicon buffer layer proves to be effective in inhibiting surface catalytic effect of iron and also prevents carbon species from diffusing into the bulk. The composite films adhere well to the substrates even upon imposing a scratch load of 68 newtons. They can also be bent up to 10°and still remain chemically inert and impermeable to salt solution. One of the potential applications of these films is for protective coating on sheet metal surfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-360
Number of pages3
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Fingerprint

diamonds
iron
composite materials
metal sheets
protective coatings
carbon
fluorocarbons
carbon steels
newton
metal surfaces
stainless steels
buffers
vapor deposition
salts
silicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Properties of diamond composite films grown on iron surfaces. / Ong, T. P.; Chang, Robert P. H.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 58, No. 4, 1991, p. 358-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3dec67ff6dc14f88949421dc7c318f26,
title = "Properties of diamond composite films grown on iron surfaces",
abstract = "We report for the first time that diamond composite films consisting of diamond particles, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, and/or fluorocarbon films can be successfully deposited on carbon steel and 304 stainless-steel substrates by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The use of thin (∼200 {\AA}) silicon buffer layer proves to be effective in inhibiting surface catalytic effect of iron and also prevents carbon species from diffusing into the bulk. The composite films adhere well to the substrates even upon imposing a scratch load of 68 newtons. They can also be bent up to 10°and still remain chemically inert and impermeable to salt solution. One of the potential applications of these films is for protective coating on sheet metal surfaces.",
author = "Ong, {T. P.} and Chang, {Robert P. H.}",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.1063/1.104633",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "358--360",
journal = "Applied Physics Letters",
issn = "0003-6951",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Properties of diamond composite films grown on iron surfaces

AU - Ong, T. P.

AU - Chang, Robert P. H.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - We report for the first time that diamond composite films consisting of diamond particles, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, and/or fluorocarbon films can be successfully deposited on carbon steel and 304 stainless-steel substrates by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The use of thin (∼200 Å) silicon buffer layer proves to be effective in inhibiting surface catalytic effect of iron and also prevents carbon species from diffusing into the bulk. The composite films adhere well to the substrates even upon imposing a scratch load of 68 newtons. They can also be bent up to 10°and still remain chemically inert and impermeable to salt solution. One of the potential applications of these films is for protective coating on sheet metal surfaces.

AB - We report for the first time that diamond composite films consisting of diamond particles, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, and/or fluorocarbon films can be successfully deposited on carbon steel and 304 stainless-steel substrates by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The use of thin (∼200 Å) silicon buffer layer proves to be effective in inhibiting surface catalytic effect of iron and also prevents carbon species from diffusing into the bulk. The composite films adhere well to the substrates even upon imposing a scratch load of 68 newtons. They can also be bent up to 10°and still remain chemically inert and impermeable to salt solution. One of the potential applications of these films is for protective coating on sheet metal surfaces.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36449000259&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36449000259&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1063/1.104633

DO - 10.1063/1.104633

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:36449000259

VL - 58

SP - 358

EP - 360

JO - Applied Physics Letters

JF - Applied Physics Letters

SN - 0003-6951

IS - 4

ER -