Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins

S. Y. Ding, Gary Rumbles, M. Jones, M. P. Tucker, J. Nedeljkovic, J. Wall, M. E. Himmel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) exhibit unique optical and electronic properties due to their physical size and the semi-conductor material from which they are made [1,2]. While the isolated properties of these nanoparticles offer a number of potential applications, such as bioimaging, their future use in novel electronic devices will require large arrays of known order. The assembling of these arrays is non-trivial and requires a monodisperse sample of quantum dots in order to facilitate the self-assembling process [3,4]. We propose first to validate the concept of using natural and/or recombined (genetic engineered) proteins to build stable, water soluble QD-protein conjugates [5]. Eventually, strategies to design these structures with highly controlled patterns will emerge.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
EditorsJ.L. Thomas, K.L. Kiick, L.A. Gower
Pages165-170
Number of pages6
Volume774
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventMATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS: Materials Inspired by Biology - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Apr 21 2003Apr 25 2003

Other

OtherMATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS: Materials Inspired by Biology
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period4/21/034/25/03

Fingerprint

Semiconductor quantum dots
Proteins
Electronic properties
Optical properties
Semiconductor materials
Nanoparticles
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Ding, S. Y., Rumbles, G., Jones, M., Tucker, M. P., Nedeljkovic, J., Wall, J., & Himmel, M. E. (2003). Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins. In J. L. Thomas, K. L. Kiick, & L. A. Gower (Eds.), Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings (Vol. 774, pp. 165-170)

Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins. / Ding, S. Y.; Rumbles, Gary; Jones, M.; Tucker, M. P.; Nedeljkovic, J.; Wall, J.; Himmel, M. E.

Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. ed. / J.L. Thomas; K.L. Kiick; L.A. Gower. Vol. 774 2003. p. 165-170.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ding, SY, Rumbles, G, Jones, M, Tucker, MP, Nedeljkovic, J, Wall, J & Himmel, ME 2003, Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins. in JL Thomas, KL Kiick & LA Gower (eds), Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. vol. 774, pp. 165-170, MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS: Materials Inspired by Biology, San Francisco, CA, United States, 4/21/03.
Ding SY, Rumbles G, Jones M, Tucker MP, Nedeljkovic J, Wall J et al. Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins. In Thomas JL, Kiick KL, Gower LA, editors, Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 774. 2003. p. 165-170
Ding, S. Y. ; Rumbles, Gary ; Jones, M. ; Tucker, M. P. ; Nedeljkovic, J. ; Wall, J. ; Himmel, M. E. / Quantum Dots Stabilized By Genetically Engineered Proteins. Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. editor / J.L. Thomas ; K.L. Kiick ; L.A. Gower. Vol. 774 2003. pp. 165-170
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