Screening nanopyramid assemblies to optimize surface enhanced raman scattering

Kelsey A. Stoerzinger, Warefta Hasan, Julia Y. Lin, Alex Robles, Teri W Odom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This Letter describes how gold pyramidal nanoshells (nanopyramids) can be assembled into low- and high-order structures by varying the rate of solvent evaporation and surface wettability. Single-particle and individual-cluster dark field scattering spectra on isolated dimers and trimers of nanopyramids were compared. We found that the short-wavelength resonances blue-shifted as the particles assembled; the magnitude of this shift was greater for high-order structures. To test which assembled architecture supported a larger Raman-active volume, we compared their surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of the resonant Raman molecule methylene blue (δex = 633 nm). We discovered that high-order structures exhibited more Raman scattering compared to low-order assemblies. Finite difference time domain modeling of nanopyramid assemblies revealed that the highest electromagnetic field intensities were localized between adjacent particle faces, a result that was consistent with the SERS observations. Thus, the local spatial arrangement of the same number of nanoparticles in assembled clusters is an important design parameter for optimizing nanoparticle-based SERS sensors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1046-1050
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Volume1
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2010

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assemblies
Raman scattering
Screening
screening
Raman spectra
Nanoshells
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
Methylene Blue
methylene blue
trimers
wettability
Gold
Dimers
Electromagnetic fields
Wetting
Evaporation
electromagnetic fields
dimers
evaporation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Screening nanopyramid assemblies to optimize surface enhanced raman scattering. / Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Hasan, Warefta; Lin, Julia Y.; Robles, Alex; Odom, Teri W.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, Vol. 1, No. 7, 01.04.2010, p. 1046-1050.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stoerzinger, Kelsey A. ; Hasan, Warefta ; Lin, Julia Y. ; Robles, Alex ; Odom, Teri W. / Screening nanopyramid assemblies to optimize surface enhanced raman scattering. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2010 ; Vol. 1, No. 7. pp. 1046-1050.
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