Self-assembling peptide scaffolds for regenerative medicine

John B. Matson, Samuel I Stupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

307 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomaterials made from self-assembling, short peptides and peptide derivatives have great potential to generate powerful new therapies in regenerative medicine. The high signaling capacity and therapeutic efficacy of peptidic scaffolds has been established in several animal models, and the development of more complex, hierarchical structures based on peptide materials is underway. This highlight discusses several classes of self-assembling peptide-based materials, including peptide amphiphiles, Fmoc-peptides, self-complementary ionic peptides, hairpin peptides, and others. The self-assembly designs, bioactive signalling strategies, and cell signalling capabilities of these bioactive materials are reported. The future challenges of the field are also discussed, including short-term goals such as integration with biopolymers and traditional implants, and long term goals, such as immune system programming, subcellular targeting, and the development of highly integrated scaffold systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-33
Number of pages8
JournalChemical Communications
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 4 2012

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Scaffolds (biology)
Scaffolds
Peptides
Cell signaling
Computer systems programming
Amphiphiles
Biopolymers
Regenerative Medicine
Immune system
Biocompatible Materials
Biomaterials
Self assembly
Animals
Derivatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Self-assembling peptide scaffolds for regenerative medicine. / Matson, John B.; Stupp, Samuel I.

In: Chemical Communications, Vol. 48, No. 1, 04.01.2012, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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