Sunshine to petrol

Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water

James E. Miller, Richard B. Diver, Nathan P. Siegel, Mark D. Allendorf, Ellen Stechel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Synthetically producing hydrocarbon fuels from carbon dioxide and water is an attractive option for storing solar energy. Thermochemical approaches to accomplishing this conversion are potentially highly efficient as they avoid the solar-to-electric conversion necessary, for example, to drive electrolysis. We are developing metal oxide-based two-step thermochemical cycles for splitting CO2 and H2O to produce CO and H2, the universal building blocks for synthetic fuels. Concentrating solar power provides a means to the ultra-high temperatures required. Working metal oxides have been fabricated into robust monolithic structures and evaluated in the laboratory and on-sun at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility. We will report on the demonstration of the solar-driven production of H2 and CO over several iron- and cerium-based compositions. Thermodynamic analyses of reactions and processes and progress towards demonstrating the reactions in a unique and continuous solar-driven reactor, the counter-rotating-ring receiver reactor recuperator or CR5 will also be reported.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009 - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Duration: Mar 22 2009Mar 26 2009

Other

Other237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, UT
Period3/22/093/26/09

Fingerprint

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Dioxide
Solar energy
Oxides
Carbon dioxide
Cerium
Recuperators
Metal working
Synthetic fuels
Water
Hydrocarbons
Test facilities
Electrolysis
Sun
Demonstrations
Iron
Metals
Thermodynamics
Chemical analysis
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Miller, J. E., Diver, R. B., Siegel, N. P., Allendorf, M. D., & Stechel, E. (2009). Sunshine to petrol: Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts

Sunshine to petrol : Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water. / Miller, James E.; Diver, Richard B.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Stechel, Ellen.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Miller, JE, Diver, RB, Siegel, NP, Allendorf, MD & Stechel, E 2009, Sunshine to petrol: Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 237th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, ACS 2009, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 3/22/09.
Miller JE, Diver RB, Siegel NP, Allendorf MD, Stechel E. Sunshine to petrol: Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009
Miller, James E. ; Diver, Richard B. ; Siegel, Nathan P. ; Allendorf, Mark D. ; Stechel, Ellen. / Sunshine to petrol : Solar thermochemical splitting of carbon dioxide and water. ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 2009.
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