Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Ricin B Chain in Human Blood

Antonio R. Campos, Zhe Gao, Martin G. Blaber, Rong Huang, George C Schatz, Richard P. Van Duyne, Christy L. Haynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past few years, ricin has been discussed frequently because of letters sent to high-ranking government officials containing the easily extracted protein native to castor beans. Ricin B chain, commercially available and not dangerous when separated from the A chain, enables development of ricin sensors while minimizing the hazards of working with a bioterror agent that does not have a known antidote. Recent events have increased the risk of ricin exposure for civilians, and there is a need for rapid, real-time detection of ricin. To this end, aptamers have been used recently as an affinity agent to enable the detection of ricin in food products via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on colloidal substrates. One goal of this work is to extend ricin sensing into human whole blood; this goal requires application of a commonly used plasmonic surface, the silver film-over-nanosphere (AgFON) substrate, which offers stable SERS enhancement factors of 106 in human whole blood. Herein, this aptamer-conjugated AgFON platform enabled ricin B chain detection even after the aptamer-modified substrate had dwelled for up to 10 days in human whole blood. Principle component analysis (PCA) of the SERS data clearly identifies the presence or absence of ricin B chain in blood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20961-20969
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume120
Issue number37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 22 2016

Fingerprint

Ricin
blood
Raman spectroscopy
Blood
antidotes
Substrates
ranking
Nanospheres
food
hazards
affinity
Hazards
Silver
platforms
silver
proteins
Proteins
augmentation
sensors
Antidotes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Energy(all)
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Campos, A. R., Gao, Z., Blaber, M. G., Huang, R., Schatz, G. C., Van Duyne, R. P., & Haynes, C. L. (2016). Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Ricin B Chain in Human Blood. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 120(37), 20961-20969. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b03027

Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Ricin B Chain in Human Blood. / Campos, Antonio R.; Gao, Zhe; Blaber, Martin G.; Huang, Rong; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Haynes, Christy L.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 120, No. 37, 22.09.2016, p. 20961-20969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campos, AR, Gao, Z, Blaber, MG, Huang, R, Schatz, GC, Van Duyne, RP & Haynes, CL 2016, 'Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Ricin B Chain in Human Blood', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 120, no. 37, pp. 20961-20969. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b03027
Campos, Antonio R. ; Gao, Zhe ; Blaber, Martin G. ; Huang, Rong ; Schatz, George C ; Van Duyne, Richard P. ; Haynes, Christy L. / Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Ricin B Chain in Human Blood. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C. 2016 ; Vol. 120, No. 37. pp. 20961-20969.
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