Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage

Brandon T. Gorman, James E. Miller, Nathan G. Johnson, Ellen Stechel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Concentrating solar power systems coupled to energy storage schemes, e.g. storage of sensible energy in a heat transfer fluid, are attractive options to reduce the transient effects of clouding on solar power output and to provide power after sunset and before sunrise. Common heat transfer fluids used to capture heat in a solar receiver include steam, oil, molten salt, and air. These high temperature fluids can be stored so that electric power can be produced on demand, limited primarily by the size of the capacity and the energy density of the storage mechanism. Phase changing fluids can increase the amount of stored energy relative to non-phase changing fluids due to the heat of vaporization or the heat of fusion. Reversible chemical reactions can also store heat; an endothermic reaction captures the heat, the chemical products are stored, and an exothermic reaction later releases the heat and returns the chemical compound to its initial state. Ongoing research is investigating the scientific and commercial potential of such reaction cycles with, for example, reduction (endothermic) and re-oxidation (exothermic) of metal oxide particles. This study includes thermodynamic analyses and considerations for component sizing of concentrating solar power towers with redox active metal oxide based thermochemical storage to reach target electrical output capacities of 0.1 MW to 100 MW. System-wide analyses here use one-dimensional energy and mass balances for the solar field, solar receiver reduction reactor, hot reduced particle storage, re-oxidizer reactor, power block, cold particle storage, and other components pertinent to the design. This work is part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot project entitled High Performance Reduction Oxidation of Metal Oxides for Thermochemical Energy Storage (PROMOTES).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9780791856840
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventASME 2015 9th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2015, collocated with the ASME 2015 Power Conference, the ASME 2015 13th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, and the ASME 2015 Nuclear Forum - San Diego, United States
Duration: Jun 28 2015Jul 2 2015

Other

OtherASME 2015 9th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2015, collocated with the ASME 2015 Power Conference, the ASME 2015 13th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, and the ASME 2015 Nuclear Forum
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period6/28/157/2/15

Fingerprint

Solar energy
Thermodynamics
Fluids
Energy storage
Oxides
Metals
Heat transfer
Oxidation
Chemical compounds
Exothermic reactions
Vaporization
Towers
Hot Temperature
Molten materials
Chemical reactions
Steam
Fusion reactions
Salts
Air
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Gorman, B. T., Miller, J. E., Johnson, N. G., & Stechel, E. (2015). Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage. In Advances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials (Vol. 1). American Society of Mechanical Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2015-49810

Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage. / Gorman, Brandon T.; Miller, James E.; Johnson, Nathan G.; Stechel, Ellen.

Advances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gorman, BT, Miller, JE, Johnson, NG & Stechel, E 2015, Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage. in Advances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials. vol. 1, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2015 9th International Conference on Energy Sustainability, ES 2015, collocated with the ASME 2015 Power Conference, the ASME 2015 13th International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology, and the ASME 2015 Nuclear Forum, San Diego, United States, 6/28/15. https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2015-49810
Gorman BT, Miller JE, Johnson NG, Stechel E. Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage. In Advances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials. Vol. 1. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2015 https://doi.org/10.1115/ES2015-49810
Gorman, Brandon T. ; Miller, James E. ; Johnson, Nathan G. ; Stechel, Ellen. / Thermodynamic investigation of concentrating solar power with thermochemical storage. Advances in Solar Buildings and Conservation; Climate Control and the Environment; Alternate Fuels and Infrastructure; ARPA-E; Combined Energy Cycles, CHP, CCHP, and Smart Grids; Concentrating Solar Power; Economic, Environmental, and Policy Aspects of Alternate Energy; Geothermal Energy, Harvesting, Ocean Energy and Other Emerging Technologies; Hydrogen Energy Technologies; Low/Zero Emission Power Plants and Carbon Sequestration; Micro and Nano Technology Applications and Materials. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2015.
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