Ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy nanofabrication and hydrogen/deuterium desorption from silicon surfaces: Implications for complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology

J. W. Lyding, K. Hess, G. C. Abeln, D. S. Thompson, J. S. Moore, Mark C Hersam, E. T. Foley, J. Lee, Z. Chen, S. T. Hwang, H. Choi, Ph Avouris, I. C. Kizilyalli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM)-based nanofabrication capability for hydrogen passivated silicon surfaces has opened new opportunities for selective chemical processing, down to the atomic scale. The chemical contrast between clean and H-passivated Si(100) surfaces has been used to achieved nanoscale selective oxidation, nitridation, molecular functionalization, and metallization by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Further understanding of the hydrogen desorption mechanisms has been gained by extending the studies to deuterated surfaces. In these experiments, it was discovered that deuterium is nearly two orders of magnitude more difficult to desorb than hydrogen in the electronic desorption regime. This giant isotope effect provided the basis for an idea that has since led to the extension of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor lifetimes by factors of 10 or greater. Low temperature hydrogen and deuterium desorption experiments were performed to gain further insight into the underlying physical mechanisms. The desorption shows no temperature dependence in the high energy electronic desorption regime. However, in the low energy vibrational heating regime, hydrogen is over two orders of magnitude easier to desorb at 11 K than at room temperature. The enhanced desorption in the low temperature vibrational regime has enabled the quantification of a dramatic increase in the deuterium isotope effect at low voltages. These results may have direct implications for low and/or low temperature scaled CMOS operation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-230
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume130-132
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1998

Fingerprint

nanofabrication
Deuterium
Ultrahigh vacuum
Scanning tunneling microscopy
Silicon
Nanotechnology
ultrahigh vacuum
scanning tunneling microscopy
deuterium
Hydrogen
Desorption
CMOS
Metals
desorption
silicon
hydrogen
Isotopes
isotope effect
Temperature
Nitridation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy nanofabrication and hydrogen/deuterium desorption from silicon surfaces : Implications for complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. / Lyding, J. W.; Hess, K.; Abeln, G. C.; Thompson, D. S.; Moore, J. S.; Hersam, Mark C; Foley, E. T.; Lee, J.; Chen, Z.; Hwang, S. T.; Choi, H.; Avouris, Ph; Kizilyalli, I. C.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 130-132, 06.1998, p. 221-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyding, J. W. ; Hess, K. ; Abeln, G. C. ; Thompson, D. S. ; Moore, J. S. ; Hersam, Mark C ; Foley, E. T. ; Lee, J. ; Chen, Z. ; Hwang, S. T. ; Choi, H. ; Avouris, Ph ; Kizilyalli, I. C. / Ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy nanofabrication and hydrogen/deuterium desorption from silicon surfaces : Implications for complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. In: Applied Surface Science. 1998 ; Vol. 130-132. pp. 221-230.
@article{43243fb3dab74675805612831f8072d0,
title = "Ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy nanofabrication and hydrogen/deuterium desorption from silicon surfaces: Implications for complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology",
abstract = "The development of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM)-based nanofabrication capability for hydrogen passivated silicon surfaces has opened new opportunities for selective chemical processing, down to the atomic scale. The chemical contrast between clean and H-passivated Si(100) surfaces has been used to achieved nanoscale selective oxidation, nitridation, molecular functionalization, and metallization by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Further understanding of the hydrogen desorption mechanisms has been gained by extending the studies to deuterated surfaces. In these experiments, it was discovered that deuterium is nearly two orders of magnitude more difficult to desorb than hydrogen in the electronic desorption regime. This giant isotope effect provided the basis for an idea that has since led to the extension of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor lifetimes by factors of 10 or greater. Low temperature hydrogen and deuterium desorption experiments were performed to gain further insight into the underlying physical mechanisms. The desorption shows no temperature dependence in the high energy electronic desorption regime. However, in the low energy vibrational heating regime, hydrogen is over two orders of magnitude easier to desorb at 11 K than at room temperature. The enhanced desorption in the low temperature vibrational regime has enabled the quantification of a dramatic increase in the deuterium isotope effect at low voltages. These results may have direct implications for low and/or low temperature scaled CMOS operation.",
author = "Lyding, {J. W.} and K. Hess and Abeln, {G. C.} and Thompson, {D. S.} and Moore, {J. S.} and Hersam, {Mark C} and Foley, {E. T.} and J. Lee and Z. Chen and Hwang, {S. T.} and H. Choi and Ph Avouris and Kizilyalli, {I. C.}",
year = "1998",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/S0169-4332(98)00054-3",
language = "English",
volume = "130-132",
pages = "221--230",
journal = "Applied Surface Science",
issn = "0169-4332",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy nanofabrication and hydrogen/deuterium desorption from silicon surfaces

T2 - Implications for complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology

AU - Lyding, J. W.

AU - Hess, K.

AU - Abeln, G. C.

AU - Thompson, D. S.

AU - Moore, J. S.

AU - Hersam, Mark C

AU - Foley, E. T.

AU - Lee, J.

AU - Chen, Z.

AU - Hwang, S. T.

AU - Choi, H.

AU - Avouris, Ph

AU - Kizilyalli, I. C.

PY - 1998/6

Y1 - 1998/6

N2 - The development of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM)-based nanofabrication capability for hydrogen passivated silicon surfaces has opened new opportunities for selective chemical processing, down to the atomic scale. The chemical contrast between clean and H-passivated Si(100) surfaces has been used to achieved nanoscale selective oxidation, nitridation, molecular functionalization, and metallization by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Further understanding of the hydrogen desorption mechanisms has been gained by extending the studies to deuterated surfaces. In these experiments, it was discovered that deuterium is nearly two orders of magnitude more difficult to desorb than hydrogen in the electronic desorption regime. This giant isotope effect provided the basis for an idea that has since led to the extension of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor lifetimes by factors of 10 or greater. Low temperature hydrogen and deuterium desorption experiments were performed to gain further insight into the underlying physical mechanisms. The desorption shows no temperature dependence in the high energy electronic desorption regime. However, in the low energy vibrational heating regime, hydrogen is over two orders of magnitude easier to desorb at 11 K than at room temperature. The enhanced desorption in the low temperature vibrational regime has enabled the quantification of a dramatic increase in the deuterium isotope effect at low voltages. These results may have direct implications for low and/or low temperature scaled CMOS operation.

AB - The development of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM)-based nanofabrication capability for hydrogen passivated silicon surfaces has opened new opportunities for selective chemical processing, down to the atomic scale. The chemical contrast between clean and H-passivated Si(100) surfaces has been used to achieved nanoscale selective oxidation, nitridation, molecular functionalization, and metallization by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Further understanding of the hydrogen desorption mechanisms has been gained by extending the studies to deuterated surfaces. In these experiments, it was discovered that deuterium is nearly two orders of magnitude more difficult to desorb than hydrogen in the electronic desorption regime. This giant isotope effect provided the basis for an idea that has since led to the extension of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor lifetimes by factors of 10 or greater. Low temperature hydrogen and deuterium desorption experiments were performed to gain further insight into the underlying physical mechanisms. The desorption shows no temperature dependence in the high energy electronic desorption regime. However, in the low energy vibrational heating regime, hydrogen is over two orders of magnitude easier to desorb at 11 K than at room temperature. The enhanced desorption in the low temperature vibrational regime has enabled the quantification of a dramatic increase in the deuterium isotope effect at low voltages. These results may have direct implications for low and/or low temperature scaled CMOS operation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4243211883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4243211883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0169-4332(98)00054-3

DO - 10.1016/S0169-4332(98)00054-3

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:4243211883

VL - 130-132

SP - 221

EP - 230

JO - Applied Surface Science

JF - Applied Surface Science

SN - 0169-4332

ER -