Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials

Michael B. Ross, Martin G. Blaber, George C Schatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The a priori ability to design electromagnetic wave propagation is crucial for the development of novel metamaterials. Incorporating plasmonic building blocks is of particular interest due to their ability to confine visible light. Here we explore the use of anisotropy in nanoscale and mesoscale plasmonic array architectures to produce noble metal-based metamaterials with unusual optical properties. We find that the combination of nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy leads to rich opportunities for metamaterials throughout the visible and near-infrared. The low volume fraction (

Original languageEnglish
Article number4090
JournalNature Communications
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 17 2014

Fingerprint

Anisotropy
Metamaterials
engineers
Electromagnetic Radiation
Engineers
anisotropy
noble metals
Electromagnetic wave propagation
wave propagation
electromagnetic radiation
Metals
Precious metals
Light
optical properties
Volume fraction
Optical properties
Infrared radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Using nanoscale and mesoscale anisotropy to engineer the optical response of three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials. / Ross, Michael B.; Blaber, Martin G.; Schatz, George C.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 5, 4090, 17.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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