Valley-selective optical Stark effect probed by Kerr rotation

Trevor Lamountain, Hadallia Bergeron, Itamar Balla, Teodor K. Stanev, Mark C Hersam, Nathaniel P. Stern

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Abstract

The ability to monitor and control distinct states is at the heart of emerging quantum technologies. The valley pseudospin in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers is a promising degree of freedom for such control, with the optical Stark effect allowing for valley-selective manipulation of energy levels in WS2 and WSe2 using ultrafast optical pulses. Despite these advances, understanding of valley-sensitive optical Stark shifts in TMDCs has been limited by reflectance-based detection methods where the signal is small and prone to background effects. More sensitive polarization-based spectroscopy is required to better probe ultrafast Stark shifts for all-optical manipulation of valley energy levels. Here, we show time-resolved Kerr rotation to be a more sensitive probe of the valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer TMDCs. Compared to the established time-resolved reflectance methods, Kerr rotation is less sensitive to background effects. Kerr rotation provides a fivefold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the Stark effect optical signal and a more precise estimate of the energy shift. This increased sensitivity allows for observation of an optical Stark shift in monolayer MoS2 that exhibits both valley and energy selectivity, demonstrating the promise of this method for investigating this effect in other layered materials and heterostructures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number045307
JournalPhysical Review B
Volume97
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 25 2018

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Lamountain, T., Bergeron, H., Balla, I., Stanev, T. K., Hersam, M. C., & Stern, N. P. (2018). Valley-selective optical Stark effect probed by Kerr rotation. Physical Review B, 97(4), [045307]. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.97.045307